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Posts Tagged ‘ottawa’

PRESENT TENSE at Ottawa’s gallery Studio Sixty Six, until May 6th

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

Ottawa’s gallery Studio Sixty Six has just announced PRESENT TENSE (April 6 – May 6) where artists Kosisochukwu Nnebe, Guillermo Trejo and Florence Yee explore questions of the social structures and cultural meanings existing in contemporary “postcolonial” Canadian society in Present Tense.

Kosisochukwu Nnebe’s mixed media and sculptural work Of Canaries and Revolutions features multiple transparent layers of glass, each displaying a different portion of the painted figurative image she has depicted, so that the image of the figure changes as the viewer interacts around the work. The work “aims to visualize marginality as a site of resistance. It emphasizes the distinct perspective that derives from the positionality of Black women at the margins, and places their experiences and knowledge at the forefront.”1 It is only when the viewer shifts their view from the periphery to face the body of colour head on that the full image can be visually understood. A first generation Nigerian-Canadian artist, Nnebe’s work in Present Tense is literally and theoretically multi-faceted.

Guillermo Trejo, a Mexican artist based in Ottawa, brings print and mixed media work to Present Tense. Trejo’s largest work has the viewer encounter a large geographical map of the Americas (North, Central and South) positioned upside down and covered with timely and popular political reference. Trejo’s Flags from Nowhere, a series of raw prints on canvas, present as flags, flags of no actual country or place invented entirely by the artist, effectively “mocking the grandeur of imagined geopolitical identities – artificial places that are made out of borders. Trejo’s flags for non-existent states challenge the way a nation exists as both idea and land.”2

Florence Yee brings cultural reimaginings to Present Tense through her work of various media. Oh, Canada, an embroidered depiction of Tom Thomson’s Jack Pine, reveals its reverse covered in the original British flag of Canada, drawing from the domination of the physical and cultural landscapes of Canada by white men. Yee’s charcoal drawings in A History of Canadian Art History reimagine texts found in her university’s reading room, exposing the the lack of diversity and oftentimes racist perspectives within them. Yee’s other works in the exhibition, Variations on a Tourist Gaze, Finding Myself at the MMFA and Wallflower series all inject her socially-conscious motivations into oil painting. Finding Myself at the MMFA depicts a painted version of the artist interjected between the canvas and paint of a work in the Art Canadien et Quebecois pavilion at the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts/Musée des beaux-arts Montréal, as if the work is projected onto the artist’s body. Yee highlights the lack of institutional representation for people of colour at the museum: “I try to find my place in their space, and decide to insert myself into their paintings.”3

Societal, artistic and nationalistic frameworks are exposed and examined by these three artists, encouraging dialogue on the systems through which our society functions.

1 Kosisochukwu Nnebe, artwork statement
2 Lital Khaikin, curatorial text from these may (not) be places
3 Florence Yee, artwork statement

Text by Rose Ekins, Curator

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Time / Frame – Sharon Katz and Véronique Sunatori at Studio Sixty Six (23/Feb – 25/Mar)

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

Studio Sixty Six presents Time / Frame –  Sharon Katz and Véronique Sunatori an exhibition running from 23rd February to 25th March.

“Staging in the sense we are talking about is a kind of framing; in theatre, the stage is the frame that allows us to make sense of what is to follow – that the execution wasn’t really an execution, that the newlyweds aren’t really married. While not a part of the performance itself, the frame is what allows us to see it as a performance.”

Chris Fleming & John O’Carroll, The Art of the Hoax, 47

Sharon Katz and Véronique Sunatori, two artists at disparate points in their lives and careers, explore the themes of temporality and materiality through their contrastive but complementary works.

An accomplished animator and filmmaker, Sharon Katz brings her mixed media work incorporating pages of encyclopedias, ink, paint and found objects to the exhibition. Katz’s works depict movement and action, merging the stasis of her painted frames with the vitality in her work, notable in String Theory, where the tennis player yearns to engage below the glass with the ball, finding itself in a “perpetual state of suspended animation.” Katz has only recently begun working with paint and its role in her work varies within each piece – from background to foreground, from heavy touches to light. Also recently designing sets for theatrical production, Katz is cognizant of the ways in which each work becomes a storyboard, a natural extension from animation.

Véronique Sunatori, currently working towards her MFA at York University, creates works that offer alternative perspectives, as can easily be seen in her series of severed and modified frames, effectively reintroducing the “staging” of artwork as the art itself, albeit disjointed from its original purpose and appearance. Sunatori also incorporates her identity, born to a Japanese father and Québécoise mother, to her Portraits series, wherein she has drawn over the glass covering photographic portraits of the artist, and her Skillfully series, which references traditional Japanese wood and paper screens. For Sunatori, invoking sculptural forms allows for her work to breathe conceptually and both asks for and offers up alternative points of view.

Staged together in the juxtaposing space of the gallery, the performativity accomplished through the two artists’ works is present, provoking debate on the functionality of staging and framing and, indeed, of a suspension of disbelief.

Text by Rose Ekins, Curator

For more information click here.

TIME FRAME fb.this is the 1??

Kanata 150? at Studio Sixty Six will explore what it means to be Indigenous in 2017

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

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Image: Alexandre Aimee’s My Grandmother’s Guilt (Courtesy of the artist and Studio Sixty Six)

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Kanata 150? Studio Sixty Six‘s first exhibition of 2017 will be a group show of emerging Indigenous artists exploring what it means to be Indigenous in 2017, the year of the 150th anniversary of the Dominion of Canada. For more information, click here.

ERUPT: New Exhibition at Studio Sixty Six

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

On Wednesday, October 5th from 6-9PM Studio Sixty Six will hold the opening reception of ERUPT, a group show of new work from recent graduates from the School of the Photographic Arts: Ottawa.

About ERUPT

The concept of “breaking out or bursting forth suddenly and dramatically” is one inextricably linked with photography. Just as their images materialize into being through their chemical and digital processes, the work of Joyce Crago, Judy Morris Dupont, Geneviève Labbé and Katy Lopez carry insight and depth to the surface.

In the work of Joyce Crago it is unyielding curiosity which emerges. In What does it mean to be male in 2016? Crago explores that which defines masculinity in contemporary Canadian society. Furthermore, Crago’s work asks how contemporary semi-nude male subjects confuse the lens of traditional portraiture whereby men were dressed indicating their importance while women were often left exposed. Discovery through questioning also leads Crago to Flotsam wherein the refuse of arts organizations in Ottawa, Berlin and New York City are carefully documented. A contemporaneous nod to the Arte Povera movements, Crago’s flotsam (defined as “the wreckage of a ship or its cargo found floating on or washed up by the sea”) explores overlooked parts of our surroundings and what they might evoke about their origin and originators.

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Studio Sixty Six features Beyond The Pale & Anthony’s Pizza for “A Taste of Beer & Art!” on Friday, August 26

Monday, August 22nd, 2016

Ottawa art gallery Studio Sixty Six at 202-66 Muriel Street in the Glebe invites you on Friday, August 26th from 6 to 9PM to “A Taste of Beer & Art,” an event for art and craft-beer lovers alike! We are pleased to announce that we are collaborating with local craft brewery Beyond The Pale and Anthony’s Pizza to feature some delicious beer and pizza in our gallery space!

As our end-of-summer event, we welcome all to enjoy this special evening on the final night of our current exhibition these may (not) be places, featuring artists Laura Bydlowska, Kathryn Shriver, Alex Thompson, Guillermo Trejo and Joani Tremblay.

Founded in 2013, Studio Sixty Six is an Ottawa emerging artist gallery devoted to showcasing emerging artists from in and around the Ottawa region and across Canada. We focus on diverse solo shows to help budding artists launch and develop their artistic careers. As part of our art gallery’s program, we provide art lovers, art collectors and designers with the opportunity to access the best new emerging artists’ work for sale.

Attendees will be offered sample-size portions of beer to enjoy with pizza free of charge. Full-size portions of beer will be available for sale. Free entry. RSVP here!

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