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Posts Tagged ‘painting’

Joanne Artman Gallery Presents Half Naked: Featuring Ray Turner

Saturday, September 1st, 2018

JoAnne Artman Gallery presents its fall show – Half Naked: Featuring Ray Turner.  Half Naked, a showing of Turner’s most recent paintings and prints focus on exploring the dichotomies behind the idiom “half-naked” that powerfully echoes our own discomfort when confronted with the illusions of safety behind all social constructs through the viscerality of the painting medium.

In Half Naked, Turner takes his explorations into the emotive potential of the portrait to the next level, as he presents a group of works that refuse to be categorized by exclusion. From work to work, Turner presents a didactic deconstruction of the visual semantics behind recognizability of form through a parsing of the gray space of the half-formed, half-naked. The representational qualities of the works rely on Turner’s mastery of form and the vast range of human facial expression. Through slightest suggestions, Turner is able to utilize the properties of his medium to create images that capture and attune to emotional states. Created as an organic process of fluid, painterly malleability, the paintings are reminiscent of the dextrous exaggerations of Francis Bacon, the mastery of form and the grotesque of Francisco Goya, and the wide, luscious strokes of John Singer Sargent.

Artist’s Reception: Thursday, September 13th, 2018 from 6pm-8pm

RAY TURNER Porbus Oil on Canvas 50 x 40 inches

Ground Floor Gallery presents Act 5: Mie Yim | Sfumato

Wednesday, August 29th, 2018

Ground Floor Gallery is pleased to conclude their 5th anniversary exhibition, ” . . .  in 5 Acts,” with “Sfumato,” Mie Yim’s first solo show in over 10 years!  The artist explains her title, “Sfumato,” in this excerpt from her letter addressed to Leonardo Da Vinci – the brilliant mind who perfected this visual device: 

 Dear Mr. Da Vinci,

I wanted to thank you from the bottom of my heart for letting me use the term, “Sfumato” for my painting show.

Yes, you are the master at blending colors and shapes to the softest edges, where the lines disappear. I’m not sure if you invented the technique, but you certainly perfected it. I love the meaning of the word, “to evaporate like smoke”.

. . .  as a young adult, I went to your country to study art for a year. I saw a lot of paintings, yours, of course, and tons of other artists that were your peers and others who followed in your footsteps.   

I was so inspired.  . .  . I started out making figurative paintings. There were made up characters like bears and bunnies in fantasy narrative situations. I guess harking back to my early years. The story telling is great, but there’s this whole other thing called abstraction that you missed out on that’s pretty awesome. So I had to try that too. I literally started to break down the images. For this show at Ground Floor Gallery, I choose recent paintings.  Some veer toward  abstraction, almost minimalist, others are figurative and a bit surrealist. 

The show is ongoing to September 16th.

Kathryn Markel Fine Arts presents The Built Environment

Monday, August 27th, 2018

Kathryn Markel Fine Arts  is pleased to present The Built Environment, a group show curated by Alyssa Alexander and Celeste Kaufman.

The relationship between artists and nature has been celebrated throughout history, with landscape painting and honoring the sublime often being at the forefront of respected art. Even with abstraction, references to the natural world are common. The urban landscape, however, has not been as extensively explored. The Built Environment is a collection of artists who are inspired by the manmade world. While working in abstraction, they incorporate elements of urban architecture, industrialization, and technology that occupy these spaces. Their use of line, color, and form are reminiscent of the geometry of the city, and their materials may be sourced from the city itself.

This show features the work of Luke Achterberg, Mary Didoardo, Joanne Freeman, Gudrun Mertes-Frady, Robert Walden and Noah Loesberg. It is ongoing through September 8, 2018.

James Moore – All That I’ve Seen at Susan Eley Fine Art

Friday, June 22nd, 2018

Susan Eley Fine Art is pleased to announce the opening of “All That I’ve Seen: Paintings, Sculpture and Works on Paper by JAMES MOORE (1938-2013)”, on view from June 27-August 30, 2018. This is the first exhibition of James Moore’s artwork since he passed away in 2013 at the age of 75. The exhibition celebrates the artist’s life, which was rich in art, steeped in color and full of the love of family and friends, with a reception on Wednesday, June 27, 6-8 pm.  All That I’ve Seen is the first exhibition of Moore’s art at SEFA. The gallery is honored to host this retrospective showing, the most comprehensive exhibition to date of the artist’s oeuvre. The exhibition includes 12 large acrylic paintings on canvas, dozens of works on paper in Cray-Pas, colored pencil and paint, and a selection of bronze table-top sculptures.

“I don’t see shapes as much as I see the energy of elements interacting to move, stop, support or explode. I mostly use clean bright color to keep my world hot and alive. My paintings are like a snap-shot record – trapping the moments of an event where something beautiful happened.”

– James Moore (1938 – 2013)

Kathryn Markel Fine Arts presents Four Degrees of Abstraction

Wednesday, June 20th, 2018

Kathryn Markel Fine Arts is pleased to present Four Degrees of Abstraction, a group show curated by Anne-Brigitte Sirois. 

Four Degrees of Abstraction brings together paintings by four artists, Xiaofu Wang, Suzanne Olivier, Cora Cohen, and Morgan Everhart, working in various degrees of abstraction and investigates each artist’s iconographic relation with nature. The exhibition aims to consider the hierarchical distinctions first positioned by art critic and champion of abstract painting, Clement Greenberg, who wrote in his essay On Abstract Art(1944), “Let painting confine itself to the disposition pure and simple of color and line, and not intrigue us by associations with things we can experience more authentically elsewhere… art that is representational too easily suggests narrative and thus panders to literature.” Nearly seventy-five years and many waves of Clem-bashing later, the formalist perspective occupies a position at the zenith of the established culture, yet it remains a subject of controversy.

The show will run June 21st – July 28th.

Suzanne Olivier, Érosion du continent

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